10 Tips For Growing Roses in Upstate New York

How to Grow Roses

Appreciated for both their beauty and fragrance, roses are often a popular choice for home and estate gardeners alike. While they don’t take much more care to grow than other flowers, there are a few things you should know to help ensure their success in your garden.

  1. Bareroot vs. potted roses – You can purchase roses in two different forms: bareroot or potted. Which option you choose depends on your gardening expertise. Experienced gardeners may prefer bareroot roses, since there are generally more varieties to choose from, but more care is needed after planting. Potted roses are perfect for beginners since they are already well-established and easy to plant.
  2. Start with only a few varieties – There are over 150 species and 20,000 hybrid varieties of roses available, so it’s tempting to go all out and plant lots of different varieties. Starting with just a small assortment, however, will help you better match their colors and sizes to the space you have available.
  3. Prime location – Roses love sunshine, so be sure to plant them where they can get 6-8 hours of sunlight daily. Since NY winters can be harsh, planting your roses along a south-facing fence or wall can help minimize winter damage from freezing temperatures.
  4. Proper timing – Planting roses early in the spring, after the last frost, is ideal for giving them enough time to get established before the heat of the summer. Similarly, rose planting in the fall should be done several weeks before the anticipated first frost date to give them time to root before winter arrives.
  5. Soil and spacing – Roses like to be planted in holes deep enough to fully cover their roots, and in soils that drain well. In areas where multiple rose bushes will be installed, make sure to plant them far enough apart to allow for future growth.
  6. Fertilization – As with most plants, roses like to be fed well. This includes regular fertilization with compost and other natural fertilizers. Follow application instructions carefully and you will enjoy impressive blooms!
  7. Consistent water – Roses like to have water, but not stay too wet. They grow best when the water levels are consistent throughout the growing season. This means automatic watering, such as an irrigation system, may need to be adjusted during times of excess rainfall. Watering should also be done directly to the roots, avoiding the foliage whenever possible.
  8. Pruning – Regular pruning every spring is helpful to remove dead or damaged canes and promote plant health. For specific pruning questions, feel free to ask one of our garden center associates or have the pruning done by our landscape maintenance division.
  9. Prevent disease – Choose disease-resistant varieties and your work to keep them healthy will be much easier. Avoid diseases such as powdery mildew by watering at the roots and also keeping plants pruned back to allow for sufficient air flow around the foliage.
  10. Display your results – Gardening isn’t any fun unless you have something to show for it. When your roses are blooming, don’t be afraid to cut some flowers to put in a vase or share with a friend. After all, they’re the flowers of love!

Deer‐Resistant Perennials and Useful Tips for Planting in the Northeast

You take pride in your landscaping and we take pride in ensuring you, our valued  customers, have a positive experience in creating beautiful areas on your property.

We also know that in this area, we experience issues with deer feeding on our plants and flowers. We have compiled a list of deer‐resistant perennials, as well as some useful tips and options for keeping deer away. A deer‐resistant perennial is defined as a perennial plant or flower that deer may overlook and not eat in favor of a more preferred plant. Some deer‐resistant perennials are:

Broom (Genista tinctoria ) ‐ 3′ tall and wide, zones 3‐8, full sun. Conical‐shaped panicles up to 3″ long of golden yellow flowers adorn this deciduous shrub from spring to early summer. Adapts to poor soil.

Siberian Iris (Iris siberica) ‐ 28″ tall, zones 4‐9, full sun. Beautiful, grassy foliage makes a good contrast in any garden. Drought resistant but also does well in moist soil. Once established, there’s no weeding these expanding clumps.

Juniper (Juniperus sp.) ‐ Grows to a height of 3 to 10 feet with an equal spread. Form can be variable from low and spreading to an erect shrub. Cones are berry‐like. Leaves are evergreen needles but can turn light brown during the winter. Tolerant of a wide variety of soils. Grows best with full sun. Zones 2‐6. Native.

Peony (Paeonia sp.) ‐ 30‐36″ tall, zones 3‐8, full sun to part shade. Variety of colors, bloom times range from spring to early summer. Stunning cut flower. Avoid planting your peony too deeply and be patient with it as it can take a few years to settle in before it begins to flower ‐ the blooms are well worth the wait!

Oriental Poppy (Papaver Orientale) ‐ 30″ tall, zones 3‐7, full sun. Make your neighbors jealous with this superbly beautiful flower. Deeply cupped satiny petals, each with a pure black center, are borne above toothed, hairy foliage. Oriental poppies love to be planted in the fall for bloom the following spring. They love rich soil, feeding, and regular watering.

Potentilla (Potentilla cinquefoil) ‐ 2‐3′ tall, 5′ wide, zones 3‐7, full sun. White, pink, or yellow flowers throughout the summer. Blue‐green foliage, spreading habit. The name comes from the Greek word “potens,” meaning powerful, from reputed medicinal qualities. Enjoy the summer‐long flowering qualities of these selections and your deer will leave the taste testing to the drug companies. These tough, deciduous shrubs thrive in almost any soil.

Spiraea (Spirea sp.) ‐ Grows 2 feet high with 3 to 4 feet spread. Early bloomer with luxurious shows of white flowers. Yellow‐red new growth makes this spirea attractive all season. Best in full sun, tolerates shade, but will flower less. Moist soil. Zones 4 –8.

Ornamental Chives (Allium sp.) ‐ 6‐12” tall, zones 4‐9, full sun. Globe‐shaped flowers fascinate folks with their gravity‐defying structure. Even though many Alliums are all under a foot tall, they will catch your eye, accenting shrubs or borders. Foliage has enough onion smell to keep those deer at bay.

Northern Bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica) ‐ Typically grows from 5 to 6 feet high but can reach 10 feet. Spreads easily and forms colonies. Foliage is semi evergreen, aromatic. Will grow well in dry, infertile, sandy, acidic soils. Grows best in full sun but will tolerate partial shade. Zones 2‐6. Native.

Other options include deer fencing, noisemakers, and deer repellents. Fencing seems to be the surest option, but selecting deer‐resistant perennials is highly recommended. Visit the Garden Center and our staff will help you pick the right perennial for the right place.

Fall Garden ChoresFall Gardening Chores Made Easy

We made it through the dog days of summer, and now the leaves are changing, and the temperature is dropping. Crisp days and cool nights are upon us, which means it is time to put your gardens to bed and finish up your fall gardening chores before the snow flies!

How to begin fall cleanup

The first thing to do is to take a quick look around your beds and start with a good clean-out. Leave ornamental and wildlife-friendly plants standing. Next, take out any unhealthy plants and destroy the debris to minimize next year’s issues with squash bugs, cabbage worms, and other pests and diseases. Now is also a good time to trim any dead or broken limbs. Doing it now, will save time later.  A hard freeze or heavy snow can break more branches and cause more damage during winter. Gather up and dispose of any dead leaves. Once crumbly after aging in a heap, they make great mulch, or can be turned into beds to add organic matter.

Fall lawn care tips

Take another look around and think about the lawn. It’s best to do heavy raking now as opposed to in the spring. If you notice spots of grass that are bare, throw down some seed and cover it with a half, or three-quarter-inch layer of compost. This will help to prevent weeds later and protect the seed. Now about those weeds, clean them up now! Getting rid of weeds now, means less seeds which translates into fewer weeds when the weather warms up again. This will make your spring weeding faster, and way more manageable.

Fall watering

If you are experiencing a dry fall, be sure to water trees now through the hard frost, so that they enter dormancy well-hydrated. Evergreens (needled ones and broadleaf types like rhododendron, too) are particularly vulnerable to desiccation and winter burn.

Look for ways to improve your gardens

Thoughtfully take apart the vegetable garden as crops fade, with an eye to improved future performance. Think about tilling less, about cover crops, and about generally boosting soil health. Make sure to protect or store weather-vulnerable pots and the tender plants in them. At a minimum, move pots under cover, where they will dry off to minimize the thaw effects of weather. Finally, look back at the season and see what worked well, and what can you change for next year. Maybe you need to expand your garden and reduce the number of trees and shrubs? Which plants did well, and which one might you trade out for something else next year? Enjoy your last tomato plant while watching old man winter make his way in. Spring will be here before you know it, so relax and enjoy this season of change.  

Grow Fruit to Perfection with These Zone Hardy Raspberry Varieties

raspberry growing guideThere’s nothing quite like Grandma’s homemade raspberry jam, and you can’t beat being able to pick plump, juicy berries right in your own backyard. The good news for raspberry lovers living in the North Country is that there are plenty of varieties that grow well here. The USDA currently has us in growing zone 5a, so we’ve compiled a list of 9 raspberry cultivars that can survive our unique climate. Raspberries are organized into two different categories, summer bearing and everbearing, so the first step is to decide which one makes sense for you, or if you want both types in your berry patch.

Summer bearing raspberries

This type of raspberry bears fruit only once per year, usually in July. These varieties grow well here since our growing zone is right in the middle of the acceptable range:  
  1. Boyne (zones 3-8) – Berries from this variety boast excellent flavor and are bright red, while the plants are cold hardy and disease resistant.
 
  1. Killarney (zones 4-7) – This cultivar is extremely cold tolerant, a sure benefit in our area, and is great for those gardeners eager for their first berry crop, since it bears fruit the first year after planting. These plants will impress you with pink flowers in the spring, instead of white like most other varieties.
 
  1. Royalty (zones 4-7) – With elegant purple berries, it’s easy to see how this variety got its name. Once the plants are established, you can expect a bountiful harvest and large berries.

 Everbearing raspberries

raspberry growing guideThis type of raspberry produces two harvests – one in the summer, typically in July, and one in the fall. Here are a few of our favorite zone-hardy picks:  
  1. Anne (zones 4-9) – These plants produce beautiful golden berries whose taste is slightly tropical. They are also cold hardy, heat tolerant, and disease resistant. Since they are self-pollinating, they are an excellent choice for gardeners with limited space for a berry patch.
 
  1. Fall Gold (zones 4-9) – Another variety with golden fruit, these are unique in that they have both sweet and tart berries. Plants are also cold tolerant all the way to -25°F!
 
  1. Heritage (zones 4-8) – This rapidly growing variety boasts fruit in the first year, producing mild tasting medium red berries.
 
  1. Jewel (zones 3-8) – These raspberries might surprise you – the berries start out red and turn black as they ripen. The fruit is sweet and has very few seeds, making this variety a top choice of gardeners who like to make preserves.
 
  1. Polka (zones 4-8) – Among the first varieties to ripen at the start of the season, these plants make for easier picking with fewer thorns and lots of berries.
 
  1. September (zones 4-8) – This variety produces sweet red or yellow berries, and is a gardener’s friend since it grows in less than ideal conditions, including a variety of soils, partial, or full sun.
Once you’ve picked the variety that’s right for you, talk to our garden center staff and get some tips about how to care for your new plants. Before long, you’ll be enjoying your own homemade pies, preserves, and other raspberry delights!

Beautiful Blooming Bulbs

Flowering BulbsThere’s nothing more exciting after a long winter than seeing little shoots of green popping up through the ground and new flowers showing their faces soon after. In order to have spring blooms, however, there’s some planning ahead that is required. Here are some of our favorite tips for choosing and planting bulbs that will make your spring yard a blooming paradise:

Choose quality bulbs

Beautiful blooms start with high quality bulbs. Be sure to check them for firmness and freshness (you want them firm and full, not mushy and moldy). In general, the larger the bulb the larger the bloom. Purchasing bulbs locally from the garden center will allow you to personally inspect them before you buy.

Pick the right planting area

Like any plant, bulbs require proper conditions in order to survive and thrive. Most prefer full sun and soil that drains well, both of which will help prevent bulb rot, but be sure to ask us if you are unsure of the ideal planting area for the bulbs you have chosen.

Plant at the proper time

What time of year you plant the bulbs is determined by when you want to see blooms. For early spring flowers, bulbs should be planted in the fall when the soil is cooler. For summer blooms, plant bulbs in the spring after the last frost date.

Plant at the right depth and position

One of the most common concerns regarding bulb planting is how deep and in which direction to plant them. In general, they should be planted in a hole that is two or three times the height of the bulb. Not every bulb is exactly the same, however, so be sure to read instructions carefully or ask us for help. If the bulb has a pointed end, plant it with that end up; otherwise, look for roots and they should be planted down.

Soil, water, and mulch

To ensure that your bulbs get the nutrients they need, add compost to the soil and make sure that the soil drains well. Furthermore, bulbs require watering, just like any other plant- just make sure they don’t stay too wet. Adding several inches of mulch on top of the planting area will help keep weeds at bay and won’t prevent the bulbs from poking through.

10 Simple Tips for How to Garden in Small Spaces

If you live in an urban area, don’t want the maintenance of a big garden, or simply don’t have the space for very many plants, your green thumb might need a little help growing the garden of your dreams in the space that you have. With the right design and the proper planning, however, you can do a lot with small space gardening. Here are some helpful tips to get you growing:

1. Decide what to grow

Choose appropriate plants for where you are going to plant them. Some plants must be planted side by side, while others, such as climbing vines, can be planted vertically, giving you color and texture and saving space at the same time.

2. Decide where to grow

If you live in a city apartment, you may only be able to grow plants on your porch or balcony, but if you have a small yard, you may be able to plant directly in the ground. Growing can be successful in either place but location does affect what varieties of plants you can grow.

3. Watering considerations

All plants need water so determine where you will get it from before you plant. Ideally, choose a growing place that is close to an outside water source or not too far from your door if you have to water with a watering can.

4. Decide how to grow

Some plants take a long time to produce either flowers or fruit, while others take less. Decide ahead of time whether you want to plant something that will grow and produce all season, or whether you want to rotate crops. This is true for both flowers and vegetables.

5. Planting budget

Determine how much you want to spend and then find the best price. Sales around holidays such as Memorial Day, Father’s Day, or July 4th are great for saving you a little money.

6. Time and maintenance

If you’re short on time as well as space, choose plants that require less for daily maintenance, are drought and disease tolerant, and can be planted in pots where weeding will be less of a concern.

7. Function or beauty

Before shopping, decide whether you want plants that provide function, beauty, or both. For example, some lilies are beautiful to look at but can also be put on top of salads so you get two-for-one in the same space.

8. Plan for sunshine or shade

Pay close attention to how much sun your chosen garden spot gets every day and at what time of day it gets it. This will help you choose whether you need to buy full-sun plants or ones that are shade tolerant.

9. Use existing structures

Look at how you can add to or enhance existing landscape features. Planting vines that grow up a wall or annuals around an existing lawn statue can provide more color and texture without taking up a lot of space.

10. Have fun

Gardening should be enjoyable so have fun with it! Remember, it doesn’t have to be perfect the first time- evaluate what works and what doesn’t and soon you’ll be gardening like a pro!

Now, it’s time to get to work! Following these simple tips will get you growing in the right direction but if you still need a little help, give us a call or stop in to the garden center.    

Choosing Your Lilac

There’s nothing quite like the sight and smell of lilacs in the spring! Along with their beauty and fragrance, they are a low maintenance shrub and really thrive here in upstate NY. With proper maintenance and care, they can last for years in your garden.

Spring or fall is the best time for planting lilac bushes. When planting, you will need to make your hole deep enough and wide enough to accomodate the roots spread out vertically in the ground. You can plant multiple bushes together to create a nice hedgerow, just make sure to space them at least 5 feet apart to prevent overcrowding.

Lilacs need an area with plenty of afternoon sun and good drainage. They do especially well when planted in a slightly elevated area since the drainage tends to be better. Once planted, make sure to water them thoroughly and add a layer of loose mulch for protection. The mulch should be thick enough to prevent weed growth and maintain adequate moisture but not so thick that it holds too much moisture.

The flowers of lilacs range in color from pink to purple; however, white and yellow varieties are also available. Their size can also range from dwarf varieties up to 8 feet tall to much larger varieties reaching up to 30 feet tall. Check out our listing of lilacs to see which one is right for your space.

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Agincourt Beauty
Height:  10­-12 ft.
Spacing: 8­-10 ft.

The Agincourt Beauty has deep purple fragrant flowers that are single, and each floret is very large; has the largest florets of all  lilacs. It is one of the best purples available today.

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Albert F. Holden
Height:  8­-10 ft.
Spacing: 8­-10 ft.

The deep‐purple buds open to deep‐violet flowers with a silvery blush on the back side,  creating a striking two‐tone effect. The unusual blossoms of “Albert F. Holden” also have an unforgettable fragrance.

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Beauty of Moscow
Height:  10-­12 ft.
Spacing: 8 ft.

Beauty of Moscow is one of the finest lilacs with fragrant, double, delicate pink flowers. It is excellent as a cut flower and provides years of satisfaction.

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Bloomerang
Height:  4-­6 ft.
Spacing: 5­-6 ft.

Enjoy classic lilac fragrance for months instead of weeks! A revolutionary new kind of lilac, Bloomerang blooms in spring and then again throughout the summer. It  does go through a rest period in the heat of the summer, then flowers.

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Charles Joly
Height:  10­-12 ft.
Spacing: 8­-10 ft.

Charles Joly is a French Hybrid with shiny purple buds opening into double, magenta flowers that are very fragrant and excellent for cutting. It is considered to be the best in its color class.

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Common Purple
Height:  8-­10 ft.
Spacing: 8-10 ft.

One of the most popular lilacs is the Common Purple. This shrub has been a favorite for decades because you can essentially ignore it and it will give you a fantastic spring color show full of fabulous fragrance every single year, without fail. Lovely lavender flower clusters sit against dark‐green, heart‐shaped leaves, and the fragrance is just captivating.

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Common White
Height: 12-15 ft.
Spacing: 8-12 ft.

The Common White is well‐known and loved by gardeners all over the world for its beauty and fragrance; one of the most powerful fragrances emitted by a plant. It has white flowers occurring in clusters amid the dark‐green heart‐shaped leaves.

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Donald Wyman
Height:  10 ft.
Spacing: 8 ft.

Deep pink to almost reddish single flowers that bloom in early June. Sturdy, dense and upright growth. Blooms  2 weeks later than other lilacs. Yellow fall color.

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Dwarf Korean
Height:  4-­5 ft.
Spacing: 8­-10 ft.

The Dwarf Korean Lilac is known as a compact but spreading, small-foliaged Lilac with showy May lavender purple flowers that are spread over the entire shrub canopy.

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Ivory Silk
Height:  20-­25 ft.
Spacing: 20-­25 ft.

The Japanese Ivory Silk Tree Lilac produces  ravishingly fragrant, creamy‐white panicles.  Landscapers love this plant for its interesting  spreading branches and vase shaped crown, its long June through July blooming season and easy care. Ruddy, cherry like bark and neat, dark green leaves contrast nicely with the creaminess of the flowers.

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James MacFarlane
Height:  8 ft.
Spacing: 6-­10 ft.

The James Macfarlane blooms two weeks later than Syringa vulgaris types. The single true pink flowers bloom freely. It is extremely hardy and adaptable, withstanding moisture conditions fatal to vulgaris hybrids.

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Katherine Havermeyer
Height:  10-­12 ft.
Spacing: 8­-10 ft.

Katherine Havemeyer is an early blooming French Hybrid that produces abundant clusters of double, lavender‐pink, fragrant flowers among dark green, disease resistant foliage.

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Ludwig Spaeth
Height:  10­-12 ft.
Spacing: 6-­8 ft.

Ludwig Spaeth is a French Hybrid with single dark purple flowers in early June that are excellent as cut flowers because of their very fine fragrance.

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Meyeri Palibin
Height:  4­-6 ft.
Spacing: 6­-8 ft.

A true slow growing dwarf. It is a small  leafed cultivar with deep purple buds opening into fragrant violet‐purple flowers in abundance early in the season.

How Flowering Herbs Can Contribute to Your Garden

lavenderIt’s time to start planning your garden! Spring has arrived (even though the snow makes it hard to remember which season it really is) and summer will be here before we know it. It’s time to think about what we want to grow and plant in our gardens and our landscapes this year. We have so many new plants for 2018, and we can’t wait to show you! But one thing we think would be a great addition to your garden are flowering herbs – they’re nice to look at, smell great and are a great addition to a healthy lifestyle!

Considering that we live in a pretty northern climate, you’ll need to do some garden planning beforehand, so you know which ones to choose. Our landscape designers recommend selecting herbs that will complement existing elements in your garden. You’ll need to consider the size of your garden, how quickly your herbs will reseed, when your region’s blooming season occurs, and the color and scent that you’re hoping for.

Cultivating herbs to stand side-by-side with perennials is a tradition going back centuries. It will give your garden that “cottage feel,” by adding a layer of romanticism, interest and freshness.

Our Favorite Flowering Herbs

Lavender is the perfect addition, if you’re looking for some color and fragrance. It blooms mid-summer and can tolerate heat. The most common types are English and French lavender. Lavender is also a natural pest repellent. Consider planting it near outdoor seating to repel mosquitos and attract butterflies. A tough perennial, lavender will last for several years if conditions are right.

Anise hyssop is another delicate and aromatic herb that grows well in gardens. It is a flowering perennial of the mint family, well suited as an ornamental. Experts say that a location with full or partial sun works best. Anise hyssop prefers well-drained soil, attracts butterflies, and is a low-maintenance addition to any garden.

Sage is another great addition for your garden. It is an herb with a pine-like aroma, delicate flowers, and soft foliage. Sage can be a perennial or an annual and comes in both blooming and non-blooming varieties. It can basically grow anywhere and one of the best advantages is that the flowers are edible as decorations on cakes, in salads, or as a garnish!

coneflowerThe purple coneflower is another one to consider. It is bred in a wide variety of colors and this tends to be a very visible plant. They grow, on average, two to four feet tall and need at least five hours of sunlight each day. Coneflowers bloom from early- to mid-summer and will thrive until the first frost. They’re rich in nectar, making them popular with bees and butterflies.

Catmint is another great flowering herb to consider with its slight aromatic scent. Do you have deer in your yard? Catmint is a tough, deer-resistant perennial that’s also drought-tolerant. It comes in a variety of soft colors too.

Lemon verbena is also a great choice in the garden. It is a bushy herb with a sweet, lemony scent and delicate pink or white flowers.

Looking for even more? There’s rosemary, ornamental oregano, lemon-scented thyme – all of which you can use for cooking or boiling for their scent.

These are just some of the best flowering herbs you can add to your garden this summer. Part of the fun of mastering the art of gardening is to try new combination! Try your hand at growing some new plants and herbs and see what other types of things you can utilize as you cultivate them. There’s nothing better than finding success in your own efforts. We can help you with every part of the process. Come on in to our garden center this spring and let’s get your garden plan ready for the summer months.

How to Attract Birds in the Winter

Have you ever spent any time trying to attract birds to your garden? It’s an entertaining pastime, and can even be quite rewarding, to tally up the various species that visit the feeders and bird friendly landscaping in the garden. While many homeowners look for their birds during the spring and summer months, there is actually a great need to help our fine feathered friends during the long cold days of winter.

During the winter months, birds spend most of their time and energy seeking out food, water and shelter. It can be a desperate time for them, especially here in Upstate New York when the temperatures plummet and snow blankets most of their feeding grounds. With a little bit of planning, however, you can transform your garden into a prime location for birds to find both shelter and sustenance.

The selection of trees, plants and shrubs you choose for your landscaping can offer birds both the food and shelter they need to survive. Not only will you be providing a refuge for them, you will be able to enjoy seeing and hearing them all year long. You will also be providing some much-needed color and contrast into your winter landscape as well!

Plant in Layers

Some birds prefer higher trees for shelter and food, while others prefer to be closer to the grounds. So when you look around your yard, consider the differing layers – a canopy of tall trees, an under-canopy of smaller trees, a shrub layer, and various ground covers and/or vines. The more variety your offer, the greater the variety of birds you’re likely to attract.

Provide Adequate Food Sources

Food is the single most important thing you can provide for your feathered friends. Food can be rather scarce during the winter months and trying to find enough food consumes most of their time. By providing a source of seed and nut bearing trees to your yard, you make their hunt much easier.

Consider adding evergreens, junipers, firs, hemlock and spruces to your yard, which will provide both shelter and food. These trees provide a great food source for birds such as chickadees, woodpeckers and grosbeaks.

Trees such as oaks, walnuts and hickories won’t necessarily provide much in the way of shelter, but the nuts they provide are an excellent source of food for many different birds.

Don’t forget about fruit-bearing trees and shrubs as well. There are varieties that hold onto their fruit throughout the winter months. Winterberry, holly, bayberry, viburnum and photinia will provide food all winter long. Flowering crabapple trees and dogwoods are also a winter favorite of birds. As an added bonus, they all provide some amazing color and interest in your garden as well.

Go WILD with your Landscape

What we mean by this is don’t immediately cut everything back in the fall. Sure, it will look nice and give you that well-manicured look, but you will be taking away a fantastic source of food and shelter. Native grasses that emerge later in the season will provide flower seeds for your birds to feast on as well as good coverage for them. Many of them also put on a beautiful show of color during the fall and winter months as well. Hair grass, switch glass and bluestem are all great choices.

You can also leave your perennials as is throughout the winter months. Just like the native grasses, perennial flowers produce seeds that provide much needed nutrients. If you can refrain from snipping their seed heads back until springtime, the birds will thank you! Birds love Coneflowers, sunflowers, Black-eyed Susans and Coreopsis for their abundant seeds.

Offer Plenty of Water

It might seem like birds would have plenty of access to water during the winter, but they really don’t. Having access to a clean source of water is critical for survival during the winter. Make sure your birdbath is still accessible during the winter months and that the water doesn’t stay frozen.

There are portable warming devices you can utilize that will de-ice your birdbath during the cold months. You might also want to consider investing in a heated birdbath. As long as they have access to fresh water daily they have a much greater chance of survival.

Even the smallest changes in your landscaping can make a huge impact for the birds in your area. By just adding a few bird friendly shrubs or trees, your garden will soon become a valuable resource for your feathered friends.

New York State Pride in Apple Growing

toadflax-applesHere in New York State, we have a lot to be proud of, and our apple growing is just one. We produce approximately one-fifth of the total United States production, growing different varieties at the same time as quantity. Apples are essential to good health and are rewarding to grow. According to Cornell University, “Apples are a very significant part of the diet and are one of the best sources of antioxidant phenolic compounds in the Western world.” They have also identified a dozen compounds, called triterpenoids, in apple peels that inhibited cancer cells from growing in other studies. We have put together a list of the most popular NY apple varieties and some information and qualities for each type.
  • Empire apples – It’s a sweet-tart combination that’s great for everything. It is said to be the perfect blend of sweet and tart, and is juicy and crisp, with a tender white flesh. Great for eating and salads. Also good for sauce, baking, pies, and freezing. The New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva introduced this variety whose parent varieties are McIntosh and Red Delicious in 1966.
  • McIntosh apples – People have enjoyed this apple since 1811 when John McIntosh discovered the first seedling. McIntosh apples grow particularly well in New York’s cool climate! They are sweet with a tart tang, very juicy, and have a tender white flesh. They are excellent for eating, sauce, salads, and pies.
  • Red delicious apples – Red Delicious have the slight tartness so characteristic of apples from New York. They are sweet, juicy, and have a crisp yellow flesh. They are excellent for eating and salads.
  • Cortland apples – This great all-purpose apple was developed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva in 1898. They are sweet with a hint of tartness, juicy, and have a tender white flesh. They are good for freezing, eating, salads, baking, and pies.
  • Golden delicious apples – These apples have a mildly sweet flavor, are juicy, and have a crisp light yellow flesh. They are excellent for eating, salads, sauce, baking, pies, and freezing. You can cut down the sugar in pies and sauces made from Golden Delicious apples.
  • Red Rome apple – This old time variety originated in Ohio in 1816, but is widely grown in New York State. They are mildly tart and have a firm, greenish white flesh. Excellent for sauce, baking, pies, salad, and freezing.
  • Gala apples – This is a new variety developed in New Zealand. It is said to have the mild flavor that “picky eaters” prefer and a bright yellow-red color that is visually appealing. They have a mild, sweet flavor, are juicy, and have a crisp, creamy yellow finish. Excellent for eating and salads.
  • Honeycrisp apples – They have a “honey-sweet” taste, a complex sweet-tart flavor, are juicy, and have a super yellow crisp finish. They are excellent for eating, salads, baking, pies, and sauce.
  • Braeburn apples – Great for snacks and salads, this type of apple is a great choice. It has a sweet and tangy flavor, is aromatic and juicy, and has a super crisp texture with yellow flesh. It is also excellent for snacking, cooking, salads, and sauce.
  • Macoun apples – This apple is the perfect way to satisfy your sweet tooth! Macouns are extra sweet and aromatic, very juicy, and are excellent for eating fresh, sauces, and salads.
  • Fuji apples – Fujis are great snacking apples. Super sweet, super juicy, and super crisp. Excellent in salads, eating fresh, and making sauce.
  • Jonagold apples – Jonagold is the perfect baking apple. It has a honey-sweet flavor with a hint of tartness. The crisp, creamy yellow flesh is juicy and is good for pies and freezing. They make great fried apples! Simply sauté in a little butter with a little cinnamon. No sugar needed!